Water and Sewer Utility

Contact Information
Any questions or concerns can be addressed by the City Clerk/Treasurer's Office:
Joy Buboltz - Deputy  Clerk/Treasurer
Brillion City Hall
130 Calumet Street
Brillion, WI  54110
Phone:  920-756-2250

Consumer Confidence Report from Brillion Waterworks
Click here to view the Consumer Confidence Report.  If you would like to know more about  the information contained in this report, please contact William C Drumm at 920-756-2850.

Billing Information
Water and Sewer Utilities are billed quarterly.  Public Fire Protection Service Charges are also included on the bill.  Cash, checks or money orders are accepted.  Credit and debit cards are also accepted for a fee.  Make checks payable to the Brillion Utility Commission, 130 Calumet Street, Brillion, WI  54110.

Water Utility Rates
Brillion property owners connected to the water and sewer service area are charged a quarterly service charge plus a volume charge on all bills.

Sewer Utility Rates
Brillion property owners connected to the sewer service area are charged a quarterly rate plus a volume charge on all bills.

Quarterly Public Fire Protection Service Charge
This service charge is a flat fee dictated by the size of meter servicing the property.

Facts About Sewer Backup Incidents

Sanitary sewer overflows can be caused by a number of factors.  They usually involve sewer pipe blockages in either main sewer lines or service laterals (lines between buildings and the main line).  Causes may include pipe breaks or cracks due to tree roots, system deterioration, insufficient system capacity due to residential or commercial growth, or construction mishaps.  In homes and office plumbing systems, the main cause is accumulation of grease, tree roots, hair, or solid materials, such as disposable diapers or sanitary napkins that are too large for wastewater pipes to handle.  Such materials may cause major backups in City lines as well as in residents’ lateral lines                                The following are preventive measures you can take to prevent sewage backup in your home.

  • Avoid putting grease down your garbage disposal or household drain.  It can solidify, collect debris and accumulate in City lines, or build up in your own system.
  • Never flush disposable diapers, sanitary napkins or paper towels down the toilet.  They could stop up your drains and may damage your plumbing system.
  • If the lateral line in your older home has a jointed pipe system, consider whether the roots of large shrubs or trees near the line could invade and break pipes.  It is a good idea to know the location of your lateral line(s). 
  • If the lowest level of your home is below ground level, such as a basement floor drain, it may one day be affected by a backup.  One way to prevent sewage backup through such below ground areas is to install a “back-flow valve” on the lowest drain(s).  You can also use a plumber’s test plug to close these drains when not in use.
  • Check with your insurance agent to make sure you have adequate insurance coverage.  The City cannot assume financial responsibility for damages resulting from sewage backups, since most stoppages are related to conditions that are beyond the City’s control.  That is why it is important that property owners confirm that they are adequately insured. 
    Facts About Sewer Backup Incidents:

    Sanitary sewer overflows can be caused by a number of factors.  They usually involve sewer pipe blockages in either main sewer lines or service laterals (lines between buildings and the main line).  Causes may include pipe breaks or cracks due to tree roots, system deterioration, insufficient system capacity due to residential or commercial growth, or construction mishaps.  In homes and office plumbing systems, the main cause is accumulation of grease, tree roots, hair, or solid materials, such as disposable diapers or sanitary napkins that are too large for wastewater pipes to handle.  Such materials may cause major backups in City lines as well as in residents’ lateral lines
  • The following are preventive measures you can take to prevent sewage backup in your home.

    • Avoid putting grease down your garbage disposal or household drain.  It can solidify, collect debris and accumulate in City lines, or build up in your own system.
    • Never flush disposable diapers, sanitary napkins or paper towels down the toilet.  They could stop up your drains and may damage your plumbing system.
    • If the lateral line in your older home has a jointed pipe system, consider whether the roots of large shrubs or trees near the line could invade and break pipes.  It is a good idea to know the location of your lateral line(s). 
    • If the lowest level of your home is below ground level, such as a basement floor drain, it may one day be affected by a backup.  One way to prevent sewage backup through such below ground areas is to install a “back-flow valve” on the lowest drain(s).  You can also use a plumber’s test plug to close these drains when not in use.
    Check with your insurance agent to make sure you have adequate insurance coverage.  The City cannot assume financial responsibility for damages resulting from sewage backups, since most stoppages are related to conditions that are beyond the City’s control.  That is why it is important that property owners confirm that they are adequately insured. 

    Do Your Part:
    The City of Brillion is working to remove clearwater from the sanitary sewer system.  Clearwater in the system overloads the system.  What happens when the system can’t handle all of the flow?  Some residents experience what we would all dread, sewage flow back-up into basements.  Heavy rain events can also lead to bypassing flows, which means discharging dirty water onto the ground and into Spring Creek or the Marsh.
    What can you do?
    • Disconnect your sump pump line from the sanitary sewer system.
      If you have a foundation drain, disconnect it from the sanitary sewer system.
      Down spouts from the roof cannot be connected to the sanitary sewer system.
      All openings to the sanitary sewer are to be sealed.

      It is illegal to discharge unpolluted waters, such as stormwater, groundwater, roof runoff, subsurface drainage or cooling water to any sanitary sewer (OR00-13, Section 98-296).  The DNR has issued orders that the City must remove clearwater from the system.

      Even though your contribution may seem small, we are all in this together!  Please do your part.  If you have questions please call 920-756-2250.

Updated Water and Sewer Rates -
Effective March 1, 2018

Lead Public Education Program for Municipal Water Systems Brochure

Conserving Water Brochure
-Hints and tips to save water at your home

Wellhead Protection:  An ounce of prevention...
-Wellhead Protection is a preventive program designed to protect public water supply wells.  The goal of wellhead protection is to prevent contaminants from entering public water supply wells by managing the land that contributes water to the wells.